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desi-girl-problems:

He called on parents to take responsibility for their sons’ actions, saying parents must teach their sons the difference between right and wrong.

"When we hear about these rapes our heads hang in shame," Mr Modi said.

"Young girls are always asked so many questions by their parents, like ‘where are you going?’. But do parents dare to ask their sons where they are going?" he asked.

Those who commit rape are also someone’s sons. It’s the responsibility of the parents to stop them before they take the wrong path,” he added.

___

Okay, say what you want about him, but this is a big deal. This is Prime Minister Modi’s first Independence Day address since being elected. And instead of using this time to talk about Pakistan, like every other Independence Day speech in the past, he stood up there and talked about INDIA’s need for improvement. And amongst his topics, he talked about rape.

And he didn’t describe it as “accidental” or “boys making mistakes”, and he didn’t state that women need to “dress more dignified”, all of which have been said by other Indian politicians. For once, we’re hearing someone put the blame on the rapist, and actually calling out parents to raise their sons properly. Like everyone else, I’m still hoping Modi isn’t another PM who is all talk.

(via misandry-mermaid)

tallporcupine asked: Do you believe in equality of the genders? Or are you an advocate for male oppression/genocide?


Answer:

misandry-mermaid:

princessskittybot:

U kno what’s harder than being a nerotypical parent raising an autistic kid???? Being an autistic kid who’s been conditioned to believe you are a burden to your entire family

(Source: autistichatchworth, via thisisableistasf)

tomarza:

armenian portraits (ilya vartanian) 

(via angrywocunited)

gronos:

pearlgains:

brattylifts:

Idk where to even start with this one

"The white man is oppressed now more than ever."

"The white man is oppressed now more than ever."

"The white man is oppressed now more than ever."

(via kristinacolbert)

beeishappy:

Phillip Agnew of The Dream Defenders. The Dream Defenders is a human rights organization that’s building leadership and power among young people of colour to challenge racism in their communities.Phillip Agnew on All In

(via heartofcuriosity)

Ferguson’s constitutional crisis: First Amendment violations are only part of the story. (via dendroica)

When you Institutionalize racism for so long and to such an extent, all KINDS of violations become permissible. But it STARTS with making racist practices PART of your societal structure. Institutional Racism is not an ‘excuse’ nor is it a myth. The above listed occurrences STEM from it’s implicit EXISTENCE.

(via bilt2tumble)

(via bilt2tumble)

Far fewer articles describe the other constitutional violations taking place on the streets of Missouri, and those violations are every bit as urgent as the infringements on speech and assembly. We’ve seen very little coverage of the use of tear gas and rubber bullets as constitutional violations. But the due process clause bans the police from using excessive force even when they are within their rights to control a crowd or arrest a suspect. And tear gas is in a category all its own. Not only is unleashing it into a crowd an unconstitutional exercise of excessive force, but its use is banned by international law. That’s one of the reasons Amnesty International sent a team of investigators to Ferguson. Similarly, the use of rubber bullets under the circumstances is also unconstitutional. Some kinds of rubber bullets are more unconstitutional than others, because certain types are more likely to injure and maim.

But excessive use of force is only the beginning. Pulling people out of the crowd and arresting them without probable cause (or for being 2 feet off the sidewalk) violates the Fourth and 14th Amendments, particularly when those arrests are disproportionately of black protesters. The general arrest statistics in Ferguson reveal what looks to be a stunning constitutional problem. According to an annual report last year from the Missouri attorney general’s office, Ferguson police were twice as likely to arrest blacks during traffic stops as they were whites. Emerging reports about racial disparities in Ferguson’s criminal justice system and the ways in which the town uses trivial violations by blacks to bankroll the city (and disenfranchise offenders) all represent constitutional questions. Why don’t we characterize them as such? These are not just violations of the law or bad policy. These are violations of our most basic and fundamental civil liberties.

Of course, probably the biggest potential constitutional violation of all—and eyewitness testimony suggests this as a real possibility—is the alleged use of excessive force by the police in shooting an unarmed 18-year-old at least six times. Under the law, each of those bullets must be separately justified, as necessary, even if one believes the officer’s story that Michael Brown rushed him. To be sure, the news media has covered this, but very few of us talk about the shooting as a potential violation of the Constitution. Remember, the Constitution is the foundational bargain between the people and their government, the framework on which our legal order rests. When we fail to talk about the arrests, searches, racial profiling, and government brutality in constitutional terms, we are failing to capture how profoundly the state has betrayed its promises.

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